Vivaldi Edition [Naïve]

The Vivaldi Edition, a recording venture conceived by the Italian musicologist Alberto Basso and the independent label Naïve, is one of the most ambitious recording projects of the twenty-first century.
Its principal objective is to record the massive collection of Vivaldi autograph manuscripts preserved today in the Biblioteca Nazionale in Turin, some 450 works. Incredibly, this is the private library of scores Vivaldi had at home at the time of his death in Vienna in 1741 and includes his extant operas, hundreds of concertos, sacred compositions and cantatas. Much of this music has not been heard since the 18th century. The release of more than 100 CDs, which began in 2000, will extend over the next ten years. The Vivaldi Edition's goal is to make this extraordinary wealth of music available to the public and at the same time to reveal the full genius of Vivaldi, not only as a composer of instrumental music, for which he was already known, but as the creator of some of the 18th-century's most exhilarating vocal music.

Пароль для всех архивов: vivaldi-naive
Таблица сортируемая, кликайте по загловкам колонок.
Все* альбомы в потрековом flack. На некоторых портативных плеерах, тех, что созданы сумрачным китайским гением, при переходе от трека к треку случаются громкие и неприятные щелчки. Опытным путём установлено, что удаление из файлов зашитых в них обложек (cover) помогает решить эту проблему.
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* – диск «Vivaldi Operas Vol.2» как по спектру, так и по размеру файлов – чистой воды апконверт.

     Диск       Исполнители / описание     Дата
Concerti per Violoncello [vol.1]
Concerti per Violoncello [vol.1]
Christophe Coin (violoncello)
Il Giardino Armonico
Giovanni Antonini

Part of the huge, ongoing Edition Vivaldi on the Naïve label, this welcome disc (volume 34 in the series) is doubtless the first volume in a complete ingathering of Vivaldi’s cello concertos. Vivaldi’s sympathetic understanding of the cello and its possibilities as a solo instrument is evident in almost everything he wrote for it. This is readily apparent both in his concertos (some twenty seven or eight in number) and also in his sonatas for the instrument (nine of them). As that great Vivaldian Michael Talbot puts in the booklet note to the present CD, this was a composer for cello who “understand profoundly its ‘soul’ – its genius for expressing songful melody (often melancholy in mood) and its equal capacity for dazzling passage-work”. Read more…

Christophe Coin’s reading of these concertos finds in them a particular quality of introspection, even introversion. Though he has all the technique necessary for the fast passage-work of which Talbot speaks, Coin rarely takes the opportunity to “dazzle”. Even the faster outer movements place more emphasis on grace, even a degree of elegant deliberation, than on flamboyance or sheer punch. As one knows from many of their other recordings Il Giardino Armonico can ‘do’ punch and flamboyance as well as, or better than, most; but here there is a kind of conscious restraint, a sense of power held in reserve, which complements the innerness of Coin’s playing with beautiful aptness.

There is a striking beauty to some of these outer movements, a refined, dancing formality to which the continuo playing of Luca Pianta (theorbo and baroque guitar) and Riccardo Doni (harpsichord) makes almost as memorable a contribution as the soloist himself does. The closing allegro of RV 419, for example, is a gem, combining two sets of three variations with a rondo-like structure; the interplay between soloist and ensemble has an intimacy reminiscent of chamber music. In RV 409 Coin is joined, as fellow soloist, by bassoonist Alberto Guerra - who might have been given slightly more prominent billing - and the two work together very subtly in this distinctive concerto, in which first and second movements each alternate fast and slow sections before the work is rounded off by a closing allegro.

Good as some of these things are, it is perhaps in the slow movements that Coin’s interpretation is most memorable. Several of the andantes and largos are spun out with sustained lyricism at slower than usual tempos and the effects are often ravishingly beautiful. In the slow movements of some of Vivaldi’s concertos the scoring is for cello and continuo alone, so that we are, to all intents and purposes, in the world of the cello sonatas. The largo of RV 410 is scored for cello and continuo only and is of the finest of all of Vivaldi’s creations for the instrument. It has an exquisite and pathetic melodic line, to which Coin certainly does full justice. The largo of RV 398 is again scored purely for cello and continuo, and again its poignancy is very moving, the continuo work, like Coin’s own playing, of the very highest order.

Perhaps these relatively introspective readings of the concertos will not be to everyone’s taste; some might even feel the recording balance gives a little too much prominence to Coin. My own initial reservations melted away with repeated listenings. These are subtle, intensely personal readings of the concertos and while, perhaps, you might not want them to be the only recording of the concertos on your shelves, the committed lover of Vivaldi will certainly want them on his or her shelves.
© Glyn Pursglove

2007
OP30426

Concerti per Violoncello [vol.1]

Tito Manlio
Tito Manlio
Nicola Ulivieri & Christian Senn (bass-baritone)
Karina Gauvin (soprano)
Ann Hallenberg, Debora Beronesi & Barbara di Castri (mezzo-soprano)
Marijana Mijanovic (contralto)
Mark Milhofer (tenor)
Academia Bizantina
Ottavio Dantone

The cast, headed by Karina Gauvin in the heroic castrato role of Manlio, son of Tito Manlio, is very good indeed. Notwithstanding a few cuts, this production is a triumph prefaced, in the absence of an overture, by a scintillating account of the G major Concerto/Sinfonia (RV 146) for ripieno strings – a real cracker of a piece. Bravo!

2006
OP30413

Tito Manlio

Concerti per Archi (vol.2)
Concerti per archi II
Concerto Italiano
Rinaldo Alessandrini

The concertos for strings are a very special genre in Vivaldi's output. Contrary to the concertos for solo instruments, those offer a real balance and amazing range of colours between all the intruments concerned. Following a very successful first volume, released in 2004, Rinaldo Alessandrini and Concerto Italiano offer a new milestone recording in Vivaldi's instrumental music, full of colours and refinement. Read more…

Part of a large Vivaldi edition issued by Italian historical-instrument specialist Rinaldo Alessandrini and his Concerto Italiano, this is the second album devoted to Vivaldi's Concerti per archi, or concertos for strings. Alessandrini uses just one instrument per part here, and although his usual orchestra at the Ospedale della Pietà girls' residence was clearly larger, it's hard to argue with his choice for these pieces, especially inasmuch as it's not clear exactly how they were used (the booklet also argues that they were related to the 17th-century sonata a quattro, further suggesting a small-ensemble approach).

These are almost miniatures, three-movement works with each movement just a bit over one minute long (or two minutes in a few cases), and the smaller ensemble scale fits them. So does Alessandrini's characteristically vigorous, punchy approach, scaled down from his quasi-operatic readings of larger instrumental works but losing nothing in highly percussive attacks and stirring, rapid tempos. Not everyone buys this turbo-Vivaldi approach, but it works especially well here. Each of these little movements seems to be exploring a particular possibility of Vivaldi's language, and while 33 of them in a row may seem like a lot, anyone hooked on Vivaldi won't find the album tedious in the least. Together with strong engineering from Naïve and some typically wild graphics that could have come out of Vogue magazine -- or might even have been too far out there for Vogue — this is another fine entry in Alessandrini's series.
© James Manheim

==============================================

Vivaldi's Concerti for string orchestra without soloist are a very interesting set of pieces. At once they display Vivaldi's unique mastery of fugal writing, all the way down to some of his most simplified music. They are relentlessly orchestral, displaying an ensemble as if it is a single instrument, a wall of ideas. Vivaldi seemed to love writing these works, as though it were a lab for him to try different ideas without distraction. He seemed very cautious of this form, thinking the audience would tire quickly of the texture without soloists, so these works are all short. Some of these works appear to be 'orchestral etudes'--works to practice up the Pieta girls on certain skills of ensemble playing. Others appear to be 'garden music,' to be enjoyed casually by connoisseurs. Still others are mysterious in their purpose or inspiration. Give the counterpoint and solemn mood, some may have been intended for the church. A few seem related to opera sinfonias. The slow movements of these works are odd and old-fashioned much of the time, displaying texture and harmony without the normal Vivaldian melodic glimmer. Some of the slow movements are written in sinfonia style, with a lonely melody played by the violins, but this is the exception.

This particular recording of a selection of these works is something I can't stop listening to. I hold these pieces in high regard, but making an album of them is tough because the right variety of selection is key--a mix of the 'lighter' works with catchy, clever, unambitious writing, and the 'heavy' works with more dense writing and sometimes fugues. This album is heavy on the light clever works. The first volume is a better mix (also recorded by Concerto Italianao). So why can't I stop listening to this one? The recording. The Concerto Italiano of old had a competent, but somewhat dry sound. This recording is a change--the sound is totally different with the group playing 'one to a part'. Suddenly their sound sparkles. They seem reenergized.

Highlights include: Concerto in e minor RV 134 is one of Vivaldi's masterpieces in the genre. It opens with a delightfully mysterious fugue. The slow movement is an odd version of his opera sinfonia style. The piece ends with an intense dance.

Concerto in G major RV 151 is titled Alla Rustica and it sounds natural with one to a part.

Concerto in B flat major RV 164 is of the simple catchy mold. The opening movement has a sense of delight that defies explanation.

Concerto in d minor RV 127 is of the etude mold. In the slow movement, the Concerto Italiano uses an amazing 'shimmer' bowing effect.

Concerto in B flat major RV 166 is of the catchy mold and includes hard to forget syncopated tune in the first movement.

Concerto in g minor RV 157 is another masterpiece of the genre. It opens with a hard edged chaconne (variations over a repeated bass line) of great intensity. The slow movement is in somber 'old-style'. The last movement conforms to Vivaldi's stormy conception of the key of g minor.

Of the albums I've sampled featuring Vivaldi's concerti without soloist, my favorites are this one and Simon Standage's volume 2. The Concerto Italiano's volume one is a great mix, but lack the sparkle and vitality of my favorite recordings.
© Andrew Judkins

2014
OP30554

Concerti per Archi (vol.2)

Teuzzone
Teuzzone
Paolo Lopez (male soprano)
Raffaella Milanesi (mezzo-soprano)
Delphine Galou (contralto)
Roberta Mameli (soprano)
Furio Zanasi (baritone)
Antonio Giovannini (counter-tenor)
Makoto Sakurada (tenor)
Le Concert des Nations
Jordi Savall

This is a real achievement and one which makes this set most collectible. The acoustic is consistently sympathetic – paradoxically placid, almost. Yet the voices and music are never lost, nor is there ever even remotely a hint of lethargy. At the same time, Savall's gift of subtly evoking from his principals their own involvement and individual attachments to the score works well. One is conscious of a great deal of acting as much as of 'mere' singing. The music is varied, delightful, much of the time beautiful and always very Vivaldian.
Read more…

This three CD set from Naïve is part of the continuing series of Vivaldi's works - many in the composer's original autograph - contained in the immensely valuable and significant collection at the Biblioteca Nazionale Universitaria di Torino. That alone ought to guarantee its quality. That the singers are expert soloists working so well with the Concert des Nations conducted by the ever-energetic and perceptive Jordi Savall should only add to the appeal of this release.

They do. This is yet another set to be bought not only by all those collecting the Vivaldi Edition but also by those who enjoy Baroque opera at its crispest, most trenchant and most communicative. It will also draw in those, perhaps, who only know Vivaldi's most popular works. It would be naïve to ignore that aspect of this immense project which explicitly - certainly implicitly - aims to make the case for Vivaldi's operas. It will help serve to correct the imbalance whereby all too many music-lovers believe that Vivaldi's only - at least greatest - works are instrumental… varieties of concerto in particular.

Like the others issued so far, Teuzzone has depth, pathos, a felicitous mixture of simplicity with maturity and a great sensitivity to its subject matter. In Savall's conception at least Teuzzone covers similar ground to that of some of Mozart's operas. Listen to the duet Que amaro contento [CD.1. tr.17]; it is short and poignant without an excess syllable or bar. This is typical of the undemonstrative, almost understated approach taken by Savall. One is struck from the first scene by the quiet, lambent pace and the peaceful dynamic which the conductor employs. Couple this with the gentle, contained, transparent approach of the singers and the restraint of the instrumentalists.

This measured and focused conception and execution of the opera results in a performance which emphasises the humanity of the story over the conventions. It's hard to avoid associating this sense of calm and control with the economic and entrepreneurial circumstances under which Teuzzone was produced - in 1719 at Mantua. This is well explained in the very full and informative booklet that accompanies the CDs. Vivaldi could concentrate on the music, not the business. He had greater control over the enterprise directing it towards the music and the drama not the Lire.

In many ways, Teuzzone is the usual Baroque opera built on the stock themes of love and politics in intrigues and manoeuvres. It also has the added piquancy of a Chinese setting: less the eighteenth century's obsession with chinoiserie than the Venetian Republic's fascination with China, which first developed at the time of Marco Polo. The libretto is by Apostolo Zeno (1669-1750) and concerns the struggle for the recently-vacated throne of the late emperor Troncone between Teuzzone (legitimate) and Zidiana (pretender). These latter roles are sung with great lucidity and conviction by Paolo Lopez (male soprano) and Raffaella Milanesi (mezzo) respectively.

The same work had already provided the libretto for other operas up to ten times since 1706. It seems as though its popularity ensured a success for Vivaldi. There is little doubt that the work is Vivaldi's. But a good critical edition - for this recording, and for the Vivaldi Edition - has had to take account of contemporary insertions of the work of others' and indeed of parts of Vivaldi's earlier works. This was common at the time. You can hear this in several places. Even themes from the Quattro Stagioni (Ove giro il mesto sguardo [CD.1 tr.15], Ti sento [CD.1 tr.39], for instance) can be detected.

How crucial, then, that the singers and Concert des Nations put accretions to the thrust of the opera aside. They concentrate not necessarily on recreating exactly how audiences in the early eighteenth century would have experienced Teuzzone with its rapid momentum and recognisable emotional complexities. Instead the focus is on pulling to the fore those aspects of human behaviour that are most credible to audiences of our generation. This Savall does exceedingly well. His result is fresh without being sparkling, incisive without undue might and idiomatic with not a sign of formula. Drama and lyricism are uppermost throughout.

This is a real achievement and one which makes this set most collectible. The acoustic is consistently sympathetic - paradoxically placid, almost. Yet the voices and music are never lost, nor is there ever even remotely a hint of lethargy. At the same time, Savall's gift of subtly evoking from his principals their own involvement and individual attachments to the score works well. One is conscious of a great deal of acting as much as of 'mere' singing. Not the same thing at all as 'gesturing' or 'showiness', this assumption of the characters' personalities is all to the good. Teuzzone is alive and immediate from the opening Sinfonia to the closing Coro. Savall surely has in the forefront of his mind Vivaldi's and Zeno's purpose in promoting virtue and legitimacy in such matters as inheritance and power. This is accomplished without cant or self-righteousness. The music is varied, delightful, much of the time beautiful and always very Vivaldian.
© Mark Sealey

2011
OP30513

Teuzzone

Ottone in Villa
Ottone in Villa
Julia Lezhneva, Veronica Cangemi & Roberta Invernizzi (soprano)
Sonia Prina (contralto)
Topi Lehtipuu (tenor)
Il Giardino Armonico
Giovanni Antonini

The energy and virtuosity of this recording place it head and shoulders above the rest...All the vocal performances leap from the disc into your room with their drama and vocal quality...Il Giardino Armonico play with invigorating forward drive, rhythmic punch, and bright sweetness of tone, Vivaldi's favoured violins singing particularly under their fingertips. A beautiful, joyful listen.

2010
OP30493

Ottone in Villa

L'incoronazione di Dario
L'incoronazione di Dario
Anders J. Dahlin (tenore)
Sara Mingardo & Delphine Galou (contralto)
Riccardo Novaro (baritono)
Roberta Mameli & Sofia Soloviy (soprano)
Lucia Cirillo & Giuseppina Bridelli (mezzo-soprano)
Accademia Bizantina
Ottavio Dantone

L’incoronazione di Dario' must be considered one of Vivaldi’s most successful operas. Immediately opening with exceptional arias, it moves at a rapid pace, holding the listener’s attention throughout. Recitatives are interspersed with arioso interludes and there no less than eight 'big' numbers sure to join the ranks of 'Vivaldi’s best opera arias.

2014
OP30553

L'incoronazione di Dario

Farnace
Farnace
Furio Zanasi & Fulvio Bettini (baritone)
Sara Mingardo & Gloria Banditelli (contralto)
Adriana Fernandez & Cinzia Forte (soprano)
Coro del Teatro de la zarzuela
Le concert des Nations
Jordi Savall

Don't buy this opera if you want to have an intensely involving dramatic experience. By the best baroque opera seria standards Vivaldi fails to deliver this. His characters do not really develop and his music only skims their emotions. But if you want three hours of top quality Vivaldi, then please don’t hesitate. It’s full of musical gems and listened to out of context, can provide much enjoyment, particularly as it receives such a strong performance from Savall and his cast.

2009
OP30471

Farnace

Juditha Triumphans
Juditha Triumphans
Magdalena Kozena (mezzo-soprano)
Maria Jose Trullu (contralto)
Marina Comparato (soprano)
Academia Montis Regalis
Alessandro de Marchi

Vivaldi's only surviving oratorio, Juditha triumphans (1716), with its strongly characterised roles and luxuriant orchestration, is a true Baroque masterpiece. Alessandro de Marchi has departed from other recent interpreters by daring to transpose the tenor and bass choral parts up an octave, as is widely believed was done by Vivaldi himself to accommodate the choir of the Ospedale della Pietà. The effect is breathtaking: the compressed, female choral textures positively gleam.

2001
OP30314

Juditha Triumphans

Griselda
Griselda
Marie-Nicole Lemieux (contralto)
Iestyn Davies & Philippe Jaroussky (countertenor)
Veronica Cangemi & Simone Kermes (soprano)
Stefano Ferrari (tenor)
Ensemble Matheus
Jean-Christophe Spinosi

One of Vivaldi's strongest and most cohesive operas. Jean-Christophe Spinosi's intuitive and vital direction achieves rewarding results. His instrumentalists are first-rate and the choice of cast well nigh impeccable.

2006
OP30419

Griselda

Orlando Finto Pazzo
Orlando Finto Pazzo
Antonio Abete (bass)
Sonia Prina (contralto)
Martin Oro (countertenor)
Manuela Custer, Marianna Pizzolato & Marina Comparato (mezzo-soprano)
Gemma Bertagnolli (soprano)
Coro Del Teatro Regio Di Torino
Academia Montis Regalis
Alessandro De Marchi

As it happens, Vivaldi doesn't on this evidence appear to have been a natural musical dramatist. Yet what makes this music worth hearing is his evident desire to make an operatic splash at his first major attempt: there's music of irrepressible zest and personality; this early attempt deploys all the fiery and ebullient energy of his concertos and allies it to vocal music of neck-tingling excitement. Like Haydn, Vivaldi may not have been a great opera composer, but he did write operas full of great music. Alessandro de Marchi's joyous recording brings together a typical Italian Baroque cast for a performance and recording of skill and enthusiasm.

2004
OP30392

Orlando Finto Pazzo

Orlando Furioso
Orlando Furioso
Riccardo Novaro (baritone)
Romina Basso & Gaëlle Arquez (mezzo-soprano)
Roberta Mameli & Teodora Gheorghiu (soprano)
Delphine Galou (contralto)
David DQ Lee (countertenor)
Modo Antiquo
Federico Maria Sardelli

«Orlando furioso» of 1714 now achieves a new lease of life under a catalogue number that has just been assigned to it: RV 819. Only two acts have survived and Orlando is sung by a baritone, unlike the 1727 version. The 47th Vivaldi Edition recording and 13th opera, this first recording is performed by an outstanding range of soloists: Riccardo Novaro, Romina Basso, Roberta Mameli, Delphine Galou and David DQ Lee - don’t miss his breathtaking aria “Piangero” [Act 2, Sc.5].

2012
OP30540

Orlando Furioso

Orlando Furioso
Orlando Furioso
Lorenzo Regazzo (bass)
Marie-Nicole Lemieux (contralto)
Philippe Jaroussky (countertenor)
Jennifer Larmore & Ann Hallenberg (mezzo-soprano)
Veronica Cangemi (soprano)
Choeur Les Eléments & Ensemble Matheus
Jean-Christophe Spinosi

Vivaldi's score has a dramatic stature greater than most of his other operas. He rarely devoted much attention to accompanied recitatives, but here he composed several that are unusually extensive and adventurous. This is a magnificent achievement: if Vivaldi needed a champion to establish his credentials as an opera composer, then this recording is it.

2005
OP30393

Orlando Furioso

Concerti per Fagotto (vol.1)
Concerti per Fagotto
Sergio Azzolini (fagotto)
L'Aura Soave Cremona
Diego Cantalupi

Significantly, Sergio Azzolini easily surpasses all the technical as well as interpretative challenges (for this is substantial music) which Vivaldi presents. He is particularly adept at bringing out its shades of dynamic; he plays passages now with gusto, now with reserve. He also makes a very rounded and enjoyable sound. And is supported admirably by L'Aura Soava Cremona under their artistic director, Diego Cantalupi, in this, Volume 45 of naîve outstanding and extremely enterprising Vivaldi Edition.

2010
OP30496

Concerti per Fagotto (vol.1)

Concerti per Fagotto (vol.2)
Concerti per Fagotto
Sergio Azzolini (fagotto)
L'Aura Soave Cremona
Diego Cantalupi

The performances are very much in the modern Italian manner: period instruments played with gusto, a terrific sense of attack pervading outer movements. Azzolini burbles and rasps away merrily, yet there's poetry aplenty in slow movements, where he displays an unsurpassed palette of tonal colour… I cannot imagine these concertos better played, with such infectious exuberance.

2011
OP30518

Concerti per Fagotto (vol.2)

Concerti per Fagotto (vol.3)
Concerti per Fagotto
Sergio Azzolini (fagotto)
L'Aura Soave Cremona
Diego Cantalupi

As you would expect after the successful volumes 1 and 2, this is a very exciting recording, featuring the virtuosity and poetry of Sergio Azzolini. This 48th release in the Vivaldi Edition features a selection of the finest works for bassoon ever composed. Azzolini is like a magician with his instrument and with each CD Azzolini proves himself to be an artist of endless imagination and virtuosity and surpasses the one before. In the catalogue of Vivaldi's works, the bassoon is in fact the instrument assigned the largest number of solo concertos after those written for the violin, the composer's own instrument.There are 39 concertos for bassoon in the National Library of Turin, which means we are only just half way on this wonderful journey!

2013
OP30539

Concerti per Fagotto (vol.3)

Concerti per Fagotto (vol.4)
Concerti per Fagotto
Sergio Azzolini (fagotto)
L'Aura Soave Cremona
Diego Cantalupi

As in the successful volumes 1-3 this is a very exciting recording, featuring the bassoon as you never heard before! The 59th release in the Vivaldi Edition features a selection of the finest works for bassoon ever composed, regardless of the instrument, this is a complete view of Vivaldi's universe, performed by a true genius of baroque music. With each CD Azzolini proves himself to be an artist of endless immagination and virtuosity. With each new recording he surpasses the one before. A masterpiece.

2014
OP30551

Concerti per Fagotto (vol.4)

La Verita in Cimento
La Verita in Cimento
Nathalie Stutzmann & Sara Mingardo (contralto)
Philippe Jaroussky (countertenor)
Guillemette Laurens (mezzo-soprano)
Gemma Bertagnolli (soprano)
Anthony Rolfe Johnson (tenor)
Ensemble Matheus
Jean-Christophe Spinosi

La Verità in Cimento is a Vivaldi's rare opera. I like very much the musical ambiance that this recording pass to us. It's different that the other vivaldian operas, that are more sonorously intense. The ambience remains in lower expressive tones. Like the name of the opera suggests: the truth in chalenge. Not all things can be said out loud. This interpretation is unique (including recording), and is in charge of Ensemble Matheus, directed by Jean-Christophe Spinosi, a director of catharstic modes and movements for the musicians, but draws exactly what he wants from his orchestra and singers.

2003
OP30365

La Verita in Cimento

La Fida Ninfa
La Fida Ninfa
Lorenzo Regazzo (baritone)
Sandrine Piau & Veronica Cangemi (soprano)
Philippe Jaroussky (countertenor)
Marie-Nicole Lemieux & Sara Mingardo (contralto)
Topi Lehtipuu (tenor)
Ensemble Matheus
Jean-Christophe Spinosi

Those familiar with Ensemble Matheus will expect the immediate plunge into fizzing energy… Much of the singing is marvellous. Sandrine Piau's limpid messa di voce and breathtaking technique in "Selve annose", and her delivery of fiendish coloratura in "Alma oppressa da sorte crudele", are astonishing even for her. "Deh, ti piega", one of Vivaldi's finest arias for the tenor voice, is sung tenderly by Topi Lehtipuu.

2009
OP30410

La Fida Ninfa

L'Olimpiade
L'Olimpiade
Marianna Kulikova (mezzo-soprano)
Sara Mingardo & Sonia Prina (contralto)
Laura Giordano (soprano)
Riccardo Novaro (baritone)
Sergio Foresti (bass)
Concerto Italiano
Rinaldo Alessandrini

The finest vocal performances come from Sara Mingardo, Roberta Invernizzi and Sonia Prina, but in truth no one is a weak link. The recitatives are effectively done, the arias thrown off with dash and aplomb, and everyone sounds as if they believe in the work.

2002
OP30316

L'Olimpiade

Vespri per l'Assunzione di
Maria Vergine

Vespri per l'Assunzione di 
Maria Vergine
Gemma Bertagnolli, Roberta Invernizzi & Anna Simboli (soprano)
Sara Mingardo (contralto)
Gianluca Ferrarini (tenor)
Matteo Bellotto (baritone)
Concerto Italiano ensemble vocale e strumentale
Rinaldo Alessandrini

This isn't the 'Vivaldi Vespers', or even a reconstruction of a specific event, but a kind of 'sacred concert' in Vespers form, of the sort that Venetian churches in Vivaldi's time would mount in the name of worship. Whether he ever supplied all the music for any such occasion isn't clear, but he certainly set plenty of Vespers texts, enough at any rate for Rinaldo Alessandrini and scholar Frédéric Delaméa to put together this rich programme.

2003
OP30383

Vespri per l'Assunzione di 
Maria Vergine

Concerti per Archi (vol.1)
Concerti per Archi
Concerto Italiano
Rinaldo Alessandrini

This is a great addition to your collection of Baroque instrumental music, the perfect recording for a day at the beach or anywhere you want good music to accompany you- one can feel the Venetian sunshine, the spray from the sea and almost taste the wine as you relax on the piazza and watch people go by.

2004
OP30377

Concerti per Archi (vol.1)

Concerti e Cantate da Camera (vol.3)
Concerti e Cantate da Camera
Laura Polverelli (mezzo-soprano)
L'Astree

Once again, it is notable – especially in the Largo of RV87 – how much more romantic this music sounds played with freedom by a small original instruments group than it ever did with larger bands who were trying to put on baroque manners. In the three cantatas, Laura Polverelli has a splendidly rich timbre, so much so that I almost took her for a contralto; but later Vivaldi sends her up to heights we don’t ask of contraltos and she ascends them with ease. Her lower notes are so splendidly rich that I wish there had been more of them… I rejoice in the sheer life of all these performances...the music is all magnificent, Vivaldi at his richest.

2006
OP30381

Concerti e Cantate da Camera (vol.3)

Concerti e Cantate da Camera (vol.2)
Concerti e Cantate da Camera
Gemma Bertagnolli (soprano)
L'Astree

With the help of a really lifelike recording – the instruments truly seemed to be in my listening room – the music just leaps off the page. The quicker movements all dance, where older and heavier bands were apt to make them slog, while in the dialogues between instruments the phrases really answer each other. In slow movements, on the other hand, the music is made to speak.

2004
OP30404

Concerti e Cantate da Camera (vol.2)

Concerti e Cantate da Camera (vol.1)
Concerti e Cantate da Camera
Laura Polverelli (mezzo-soprano)
L'Astree

Whether Vivaldi wrote these cantatas for an exceptionally talented singer or just decided to give others a mischievously hard time isn't known; the fact remains that they're tough assignments. If Polverelli finds them so, she gives no sign of it. She's a mezzo with a cloudless upper register and a full-throated lower one, a wide and subtly nuanced range of volume, supple and pitch-perfect. These three chamber cantatas deal with various unhappy aspects of love, and she projects them without resorting to 'grand-operatic' excess. These are performances to treasure. The chamber concertos show Vivaldi at his most happily inventive. All those on this disc have alternative versions, and if RV97 and 105 lack something of the verve of those by Giardino Armonico they're no less infectious. The recording is clear and very well balanced, and the vocal texts are given in three languages, including English. A thoroughly enjoyable disc.

2002
OP30358

Concerti e Cantate da Camera (vol.1)

I Concerti di Dresda
I Concerti di Dresda
Anne-Katharina Schreiber & Gottfried Von der Goltz (violin)
Freiburg Baroque Orchestra
Gottfried Von der Goltz

Vivaldi composed these concertos specifically for the Dresden Hofkapelle, whose 40-plus players made it one of the largest orchestras at the time (circa 1719). It also was among the finest, and Vivaldi took full advantage of the ensemble's capabilities in these "concerti con molto Istromenti". This form differs from the usual concerto grosso in that the many solo instruments are not given equal prominence but rather are positioned in a definite hierarchy – the violin is given the lion's share of the solo material while pairs of other instruments, primarily woodwinds, get the spotlight for briefer periods.

2002
OP30283

I Concerti di Dresda

Concerti da camera
Concerti da camera
Astrée Ensemble
Giorgio Tabacco

When is a concerto not a concerto? The answer is, when it is a concerto da camera, or a chamber concerto. In the traditional Baroque concerto, one or more soloists are contrasted with an orchestra – usually comprised of strings and continuo. In a chamber concerto, the orchestra is replaced by a much smaller ensemble, and one that is comprised of a variety of instruments, not just strings. This means that concertante-style music is accessible to a handful of musicians.

2004
OP30394

Concerti da camera

Catone in Utica
Catone in Utica
Topi Lehtipuu (tenor)
Roberta Mameli (soprano)
Ann Hallenberg, Romina Basso & Emoke Baráth (mezzo-soprano)
Sonia Prina (contralto)
Il Complesso Barocco
Alan Curtis

Il Complesso Barocco is always well-balanced with excellent ensemble and fine string tone. The music is sensitively and thoughtfully phrased, and the players easily set the mood at the beginning of each aria...This is a truly outstanding recording of one of Vivaldi’s finest works.

2013
OP30545

Catone in Utica

Atenaide
Atenaide
Sandrine Piau & Vivica Genaux (soprano)
Nathalie Stutzmann (contralto)
Guillemette Laurens & Romina Basso (mezzo-soprano)
Paul Agnew, Stefano Ferrari (tenor)
Modo Antiquo
Federico Maria Sardelli

Vivica Genaux, Nathalie Stutzmann and Guillemette Laurens all contribute some good dramatic singing, and Romina Basso's creamy melodic singing is outstanding. Conductor Sardelli's methods are never extreme for the sake of a cheap thrill. Here we find a sincere attempt to let the story unfold through clearly communicated and simply delivered recitatives and superbly paced arias, and Modo Antiquo play with plenty of vivaciousness and sonority.

2007
OP30438

Atenaide

Concerti Per Violino VI ‘La Boemia’
Concerti Per Violino VI ‘La Boemia’
Fabio Biondi (violino e direzione)
Europa Galante

For the fifty-seventh release in the Vivaldi Edition, Naïve is particularly proud to collaborate, for the first time in this context, with the violinist and conductor, Fabio Biondi. In the 1990s, Biondi made some of the label's most iconic recordings, and his version of the Four Seasons in particular is one of the bestsellers in the catalogue. It is therefore a real pleasure to listen to Fabio Biondi, accompanied by his ensemble Europa Galante, and his glittering performance of the six violin concertos from the cycle entitled La Boemia.

2018
OP30572

Concerti Per Violino VI ‘La Boemia’

Arie d'Opera
Arie d'Opera
Sandrine Piau (soprano)
Ann Hallenberg & Guillemette Laurens (mezzo-soprano)
Paul Agnew (tenor)
Modo Antiquo
Federico Maria Sardelli

A CD of world premiere recordings of music not heard since Vivaldi’s day. Volume 28 of the Foà Collection is Vivaldi’s personal collection of opera arias, and includes variants on the arias performed in the operas.

2005
OP30411

Arie d'Opera

Il Giustino
Il Giustino
Delphine Galou & Silke Gäng (contralto)
Emőke Baráth & Verónica Cangem (soprano)
Emiliano Gonzalez Toro (tenor)
Accademia Bizantina
Ottavio Dantone

With an Accademia Bizantina even more virtuosic and passionate than ever, a cast of high-flying soloists (Emőke Baráth, Delphine Galou, Verónica Cangemi, Emiliano Gonzalez Toro, Silke Gäng) and instruments as rare as they are precious (such as the dreamlike psaltery that accompanies the breathtaking air by Anastasio), Maestro Dantone brilliantly reincarnates, through this legendary Giustino, the human passions of yesterday and today.

2018
OP30571

Il Giustino

Arie Ritrovate
Arie Ritrovate
Sonia Prina (contralto)
Stefano Montanari (violin)
Accademia Bizantina
Ottavio Dantone

Some of these arias are individual pieces in anthologies made by Vivaldi, or long-forgotten alternative opera arias that will not be recorded in the context of their parent work in Naïve's series. Sonia Prina has a firm grasp on melodic lines and a supple timbre. She reaffirms her status as an outstanding Baroque opera singer, and Ottavio Dantone lends excellent support from Accademia Bizantina.

2008
OP30443

Arie Ritrovate

Armida al campo d'Egitto
Armida al campo d'Egitto
Furio Zanasi (baritone)
Sara Mingardo (contralto)
Martin Oro (countertenor)
Marina Comparato, Monica Bacelli & Romina Basso (mezzo-soprano)
Raffaella Milanesi (soprano)
Concerto Italiano
Rinaldo Alessandrini

…the title-role is taken – no, grabbed by the scruff of the neck – by Sara Mingardo. Her emotionally intense performance cuts a swathe through the opera, making sense of the curious plot...[she] dominates this performance with her rich, treacly contralto which can switch with alarming speed from purring malevolence one moment to panting passion the next.

2009
OP30492

Armida al campo d'Egitto

Vivaldi Operas (vol.2)
Vivaldi Operas Vol.2
Julia Lezhneva & Sandrine Piau (soprano)
Philippe Jaroussky (countertenor)
Topi Lehtipuu (tenor)
Il Giardino Armonico, Ensemble Matheus & Modo Antiquo Ensemble
Giovanni Antonini, Jean-Christophe Spinosi, Federico Maria Sardelli, Rinaldo Alessandrini

The most beautiful arias from the Vivaldi Edition: Orlando Furioso, Atenaide, Farnace, Teuzzone, Armida, La Fida Ninfa, Orlando 1714, Griselda, Ottone in villa and much more. The album includes outstanding singers and arias that were sensational discoveries when first introduced in this series.

2013
OP30547

Vivaldi Operas Vol. 2

Arie per Tenore
Arie per Tenore
Topi Lehtipuu (tenor)
I Barrochisti
Coro della Radiotelevisione Svizzera
Diego Fasolis

Vivaldi's music is so rhythmic and vibrant it can even sound vaguely upbeat when portraying tragedy, so hats off to Lehtipuu for the amount of light and shade he manages to bring to the programme...The choir sounds gorgeously light and youthful...I Barocchisti shine when given centre stage for their Concerto ripieno.

2010
OP30504

Arie per Tenore

Arie per Basso
Arie per Basso
Lorenzo Regazzo (bass)
Concerto Italiano
Rinaldo Alessandrini

The excellent Concerto Italiano under their scholarly conductor Rinaldo Alessandrini play with skill and imagination… Regazzo is a consummate master of the art of expressing through the voice and the voice itself is an exceptionally fine instrument. ...Regazzo has the fine, well rounded tone and evenness of line; his style commands authority, with a nobility of utterance.

2006
OP30415

Arie per Basso

Vivaldi Operas (vol.1)
Vivaldi Operas Vol.1
Gemma Bertagnolli & Roberta Invernezzi (soprano)
Marina Comparato, Magdalena Kozena & Guillemette Laurens (mezzo-soprano)
Academia Montis Regalis, Concerto Italiano, Ensemble Matheus

This is a sampler of selections from the operas in the Vivaldi Edition showing off the quality of not only family the performers at Naïve, but what seems to be a whole new approach by Naïve Classics to recording classical music in the high-def digital age. And for those of us who've grown up with the classical music bug, it represents a noticeable advance in how to record classical music.

2004
OP30401

Vivaldi Operas Vol.1